Fuji Finepix X100 12.3 Megapixel Advanced Compact Reviews Roundup

On September 20 2010, Fujifilm announced the new FinePix X100, a high-grade point-and-shoot digital compact camera featuring an APS-C CMOS sensor at 12.3 Megapixels resolution, a Fujinon 23mm fixed focal length lens and a newly developed Hybrid Viewfinder.

The FinePix X100 is aimed at the professional photographer looking for exceptional quality pictures from a compact camera. The priority for this model is picture quality, so it was decided to make the highest quality possible lens and sensor combination. The lens chosen is a fixed, prime F2 lens, made by Fujinon. In additions to the newly-developed EXR Processor, it also comes with the new Hybrid Viewfinder, which combines the window-type "bright frame" optical viewfinder found in high-end film cameras, and the electronic viewfinder system incorporated in fixed single lens or mirrorless digital cameras. By using integrating a prism for the 1,440,000 dot LCD panel image on the viewing screen in the reverse-Galilean optical finder, the Hybrid Viewfinder can show both the shooting frame and a variety of shooting data. Useres can instantly switch between optical and electronic viewfinder images with simple "one touch" control. You'll also get a 2.8-inch display on the back.

The FinePix X100 is listed for retail at around $1,200.

Fuji Finepix X100 Sample Photos on Flickr



Fuji Finepix X100 Camera Reviews Roundup


GearGuide - Feb 23 2012
"After patiently waiting so long to get to finally try the Fujifilm X100, we find ourselves walking away just a bit confused. To be clear for the most part, the X100 is a wonderful camera that truly takes lovely photos. There's no question that short of a much more expensive Leica, that the X100 has to be one of the most attractive cameras you can buy, with..." More »
60out of 100
TechCrunch - Aug 30 2011
"The first thing I did was try to focus the camera on something on my desk. The autofocus labored, the image flashed, and... nothing was in focus. I tried again and again. Apparently I had to switch to macro mode for objects closer than 20 inches or so. And that's when I first used the d-pad/dial. What a cheap-feeling little piece of junk it is! It wobbles a..." More »
Not Rated
byThom - Aug 05 2011
"The big surprise from some was what Fujifilm coaxed from the Sony sensor. The sensor in the X100 is a custom one, with some offset to the microlenses. Whether that's the special ingredient that made the difference or not, you have to admire the results. This may be the first camera I've experienced where I prefer NR Normal to NR Low. For some reason NR Low..." More »
80out of 100
Photoxels - Aug 02 2011
"We find the overall image quality of the Fujifilm X100 to be excellent at ISO 200 with low noise and good image detail. Image quality is very good up to ISO 1600. Noise starts to be visible at ISO 3200 and is usable up to ISO 3200. At higher ISOs, images suffer from noise and loss of detail. The Fujifilm X100 has a fixed lens (i.e. it does not accept i..." More »
Not Rated
AkihabaraNews - Jul 18 2011
"Now it's time to talk about image quality. Like its outstanding build-quality, the X100 does not disappoint once you start using it. One of the most impressive aspects of the X100 is that from ISO 100 up to 3200, you get a noise-free picture. It is only when you reach ISO 12800 that you will really start noticing image color desaturation and strong visible..." More »
Not Rated
Imaging Resource - Jul 14 2011
"After all I'd heard, I expected to write a short list of complaints about the Fujifilm X100 and move on, but as soon as I started using it, I discovered what the buzz was all about. The Fujifilm X100 is not made for everyone who ever liked the look of an old camera. Neither is it made for every hobbyist who likes to tinker. A good selection of the photograp..." More »
Not Rated
Steve's Digicam - Jul 14 2011
"Looking at our outdoor sample images, you can see that the X100's image quality is outstanding. The new EXR system provides image quality that has far surpassed what we are used to seeing from Fuji. Its samples are incredibly sharp with great exposures and amazing color. Even when looking at the images at 100%, there is nothing that stands out as a flaw in..." More »
Not Rated
NeoCamera - Jul 13 2011
"While the most attractive aspect of the Fuji Finepix X100 is clearly its external design, it ends up excelling far more in its performance than usability, once again demonstrating technological achievements by Fuji. The 12 megapixels CMOS sensor in the X100 captures images of very high quality. Just as expected, noise-level and dynamic-range compare we..." More »
100out of 100
TOP - Jul 12 2011
"I agree with the reviewers who, almost unanimously, claim that the X100's image quality is excellent. Images are sharp and flesh tones appear natural, although the camera's auto-white balance does have a bias toward blue/green. I was initially struck by how similar X100 RAW image files appear to those from the Leica M9 and M8. Fujifilm claims that, like the..." More »
Not Rated
Digital Camera Info - Jul 03 2011
"The Fujifilm X100 (MSRP $1199.95) is the kind of camera that should only be purchased by someone that can appreciate its intricacies-and overlook its eccentricities. While the camera is capable of capturing incredibly good photos, you have to have some patience to really get the most out of the camera. The autofocus is slow and unreliable, several of the co..." More »
73out of 100
CNET US - Jun 20 2011
"As far as I can tell, the X100 delivers better photo quality than all of its less-expensive competitors, generally comparable to or better than the midrange dSLRs in its price range. It produces extremely clean images as high as ISO 800, with usable ones as high as ISO 1600. Although the results get a bit soft at ISO 3200, images don't look like they've bee..." More »
70out of 100
PopPhoto - Jun 16 2011
"With impressive resolving power for a 12.3MP sensor, some of the most accurate color reproduction we've seen, and commendable noise control, the X100 earned an Extremely High rating for overall image quality in the Popular Photography Test Lab. Its Fujinon lens, with its aspheric element and high-refractive-index glass, no doubt contributed to the came..." More »
Not Rated
KenRockwell - Jun 12 2011
"The X100 is much slower than a real DSLR like the Nikon D3100, but focuses much faster than a LEICA. The X100, like the LEICA, is designed for pros who know how to shoot deliberately, not casual shooters who shoot hundreds of shots of nothing and that hope they magically "turn out" later. With the X100, you take your shot, then take your..." More »
Not Rated
Digital Camera Review - Jun 07 2011
"Cropped sensor DSLRs of the latest generation have shown some significant ISO noise improvement over their predecessors in low light conditions, and with the X100 packing a DSLR style APS-C sensor you'd expect it to perform pretty well in the low light arena. Your expectations have been met. The X100 has a nominal 200-6400 ISO sensitivity range, with e..." More »
80out of 100
Digital Camera Review - May 31 2011
"For those of you unfamiliar with the X100, its design mimics a classic rangefinder camera but includes a hybrid optical/electronic viewfinder, 12 megapixel CMOS sensor and fixed 23mm f/2 lens that shoots at 35mm (in 35mm film equivalents) owing to the sensor's 1.5x crop factor. A 720 HD video /capability is onboard along with a 2.8-inch LCD monitor. Fuji st..." More »
Not Rated
dpreview - May 17 2011
"The X100 is without doubt one of the most highly-anticipated cameras of recent years, due to its combination of traditional, 'rangefinder-esque' design and the innovative technology of its hybrid optical / electronic viewfinder. The good news about the X100 is that in certain key respects - its basic operation, viewfinder, and image quality - it's excellent..." More »
73out of 100
Ryan Brenizer - May 11 2011
"The first thing you will note about using the X100 is that it's fun right from the start. The innovative hybrid viewfinder alone will make you want to run around and take pictures with your eye glued to it. You know a camera is fun when it wants to make you take photographs even if you know the composition is garbage, just because the act of taking a photo..." More »
Not Rated
Digital Camera Resource Page - May 05 2011
"The FinePix X100 could easily be mistaken for a Leica M9 if you spotted it on the street. It's pretty much an exact copy of a Leica rangefinder camera, but hey, it works. The camera is made of magnesium alloy (in most areas), and has a faux leather panel on the front to make it easier to grip. Being a rangefinder-style camera, you should not be surprised to..." More »
Not Rated
SteveHuff - May 04 2011
"The good news is that the X100 can put out a really nice quality image. The 35mm equivalent lens on the camera is more classic than modern, but it's VERY nice. At F2 the camera is sharp but classically smooth. By 2.8 it is SHARP and detailed as you could want it to be. There IS barrel distortion with the lens though and if you take a close up portrait you c..." More »
Not Rated
pdn - May 03 2011
"Exposures from the Fuji X100 were good and the color sensitivity and extended tonal range were consistent with what Fujifilm has been especially well known for. Strong blue rendering was evident in the skies, green in grass and textured areas of red were quite well represented. And this didn't stop the camera from resolving subtle tonalities as well as fles..." More »
Not Rated
Steve's Digicam - May 02 2011
"There have been loads of complaints about this camera as well as equal amounts of praise. So which is it? Most say the image quality is not up to the X1 and that the manual focus is not the best (I agree) but what about everything else? For me, the handling, controls, and feel are equally as important. I did do some digging and while I did not find any phot..." More »
Not Rated
RegHardware - Apr 29 2011
"It has to be said that it is disappointing that the lens can't be changed. On a camera this expensive, the ability to use a reasonable telephoto or wide-angle lens would be appreciated. Still, if you're going to be stuck with a single optic, it may as well be one as good as the 23mm, f/2 prime lens on the front of the X100. There's no barrel distortion..." More »
75out of 100
DJOP - Apr 27 2011
"Street shooting, arguably one of the most likely uses, is something the X100 does reasonably well with, providing you're in control. Any distance set manually is remembered after powering back up while the handy distance scale is shown in the viewfinder along with the depth-of-field, which is essential for zone focusing. Some slight shutter lag seen previou..." More »
Not Rated
PhotoReview Australia - Apr 13 2011
"It was difficult not to be impressed with the review camera's performance. JPEGs straight from the camera were sharp, colour-accurate and, in the main, well-exposed. Imatest confirmed our subjective impressions and showed the camera to be capable of above-average resolution for both JPEG and RAF.RAW files. Slight edge softening was revealed by our Imat..." More »
88out of 100
Trusted Reviews - Apr 06 2011
"We were lucky enough to be testing the X100 under some early spring sunshine, giving rise to blue skies and verdant flora, conditions that were bound to show most cameras in (literally) the very best light. Incidentally, this was also perfect weather to test the X100's built-in neutral density (ND) filter. Surely the Fuji couldn't fail to impress? Well..." More »
90out of 100
Pocket-lint - Mar 29 2011
"Unlike some other Fujifilm cameras that have EXR sensors, the X100 has a more standard construction APS-C sized CMOS sensor that utilises the company's latest EXR Processor. The idea behind this is to output the sensor's captured information in a different arrangement to that of standard sensors for the benefit of image quality. Exactly how, of course, isn'..." More »
90out of 100
What Digital Camera - Mar 24 2011
"Tonally, images displayed a smooth graduation through the range, with plenty of detail in the mid-tones, helped by the EXR processor. Metering is calculated with a TTL 256 multi-zone metering system, with the choice of Multi/Spot/Average metering modes. In Multi, the metering system coped extremely well under a range of lighting conditions, delivering consi..." More »
90out of 100
PhotoRadar - Mar 19 2011
"It's clear that Fujifilm has put a tremendous amount of thought into the X100 and in many ways it's exactly what many people want: a small-form, large-sensor camera, with a fast optic and all encased in a beautiful and solidly-built body. Whereas similar models have essentially been digital cameras with the influence of a classic design, the X100 turns thin..." More »
80out of 100
ePhotoZine - Mar 19 2011
"The Fujifilm FinePix X100 is a unique camera in an increasingly competitive category. For a long time the difference in image quality between compact cameras with small sensors, and Digital SLRs with much larger sensors has been well known. The Fujifilm FinePix X100 aims to bring the image quality of a large sensor to a smaller camera, and should also bring..." More »
80out of 100
Photography BLOG - Mar 18 2011
"The Fujifilm Finepix X100 is one of the most surprising, appealing and well-realised cameras of recent times, offering a compelling mix of intuitive handling, impeccable image quality, and a truly innovative viewfinder. That's not to say that you should all rush out and buy one - by its very nature a retro-styled, film-inspired 35mm fixed lens camera with a..." More »
100out of 100
BJP - Mar 17 2011
"The FinePix X100 is a simply a great-looking piece of engineering. The retro design look is just perfect, and, as Adrian Clarke of Fujifilm told us earlier this week, was a conscious choice to appeal to professional photographers - the initial design for the X100 was too "futuristic," Clarke told us, and engineers had to go back to the drawing boa..." More »
Not Rated
PhotoReview Australia - Feb 17 2011
"Fujifilm's Finepix X100 has been designed with photo enthusiasts in mind and, as such, is totally unsuitable for point-and-press snapshooters. And at a local RRP of $1299, it's priced at the top end of the compact camera market, where it competes with 'prestige' brands. As by far the most interesting camera to be released in the first quarter of 2011,..." More »
Not Rated
PhotoRad - Feb 02 2011
"First impressions of the Fuji X100 samples we were shown are that it feels lighter than its magnesium alloy body and solid metal dials would suggest, but it still feels solid and substantial in your hand. The analogue-style control dials on top of the Fuji X100 body are a nice feature, and based on user feedback Fujifilm has made the Function button on top..." More »
Not Rated
dpreview - Jan 25 2011
"The X100 is a camera that has intrigued ever since its announcement, and this has only been compounded by the wait since Photokina so see a working version. And while the model we have is still a prototype, it's fair to say that it lives up to expectations in many respects. The X100 is every bit as pretty in the flesh as it looks in pictures, but what..." More »
Not Rated
Pocket-lint - Sep 27 2010
"So, give or take, you can do most of your photography without even bothering with the screen on the back. All the same, you might want to because the 2.8-inch LCD is a really pretty stunning 1.4millon dot display and offers excellent levels of contrast and details of what it shows. It looks to be a winner particularly for playback mode when you'll genuinely..." More »
Not Rated

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787 user reviews


User Review of the camera - Fuji Finepix X100

  • 2014-07-22 07:00
    fancy camera, deadly do rock "musician"
    bought if for my son, and he loves it. the seller was most helpful!
  • 2014-05-03 07:00
    Fantastic camera. Favorite camera I've ever used. Sold my DSLR., Michael Bacon "Michael Bacon"
    The controls are terrific. One dial for aperture, one dial for shutter speed, one dial for exposure compensation, and a function button that can be mapped to ISO.
    The image quality is great. I love the tones I get from this.
    This is probably the best beginner's camera because it forces you to stick to one (very good) prime lens and encourages you to easily learn to use aperture and shutter speeds. It also has the best controls on any camera I've ever used. I sold my Nikon D5100 DSLR because I don't see much of a purpose for it compared to this - for me. If you want video and faster autofocus, a DSLR will do better. I want a small, inconspicuous, silent camera (almost no shutter sound at all) to have with me everywhere I go, making high IQ shots, even in low light. The X100 does these things very well.
  • 2014-03-26 07:00
    Camera is ok, battery life is bad, Binh Chu Kien
    Verified Purchase(
    The battery is not as good as I expected. Run out very fast. We may need at least two for one time going out for shooting
  • 2014-03-26 07:00
    Camera is ok, battery life is bad, Binh Chu Kien
    The battery is not as good as I expected. Run out very fast. We may need at least two for one time going out for shooting
  • 2014-03-23 07:00
    Not going to replace my DSLR but interesting., CameraBuff
    Verified Purchase(
    I have only had this camera a couple of days, and have been using firmware 2.01. Initial thoughts:
    Not going to replace s DSLR, at least not for me. This does not have the versatility, speed or ease of use in manual and semi-automatic modes. Having said that the image quality from carefully composed shots is comparable to my D7000.
    While not quite compact it is much less to carry than a DSLR. It won't fit in a pants pocket but will fit in a jacket pocket. Ladies can put it in a purse. For guys a strap, belt pouch or back pack (with LOTS of extra room left) would be in order if it is too hot for a jacket. I use a wrist strap and carrying it around for about half a day in my hand was no problem, except of course when I needed to use that hand for something else. I mainly got this for those times where I said to myself "I wish I had my camera" but wouldn't be carrying a DSLR.
    Even at firmware 2.01 the AF is painfully slow and made me miss shots waiting for lock. I have read that there are some tricks around this involving using the manual focus mode, but at least out of the box it is not reliable for fleeting shots. Snap shots pretty much turn out awful, beyond what would be expected from lack of compositional thought.
    Closer than about 4 feet you have to engage Macro mode. This is frustrating and once again results in lost shots if you are not prepared.
    Low light capability is APS-C, DSLR quality. You will not get full frame performance obviously, but for a camera this size I was surprised how well it handled subway tunnels. I have not tried night shooting it yet. Indoors is very good.
    The photography experience is truly modern retro rather than a modern camera with retro clothes. It is a bit hard to explain, but the Aperture and shutter speed controls are retro in a functional and also attractive way, while the modern components do not feel like they were shoe horned into an older film body (e.g. the Nikon Df.) I did not find it jarring to use retro manual controls in combination with modern control features. Everything does feel like it was designed with the over all experience in mind.
    The optical viewfinder is ingenious. The EVF is ok but has the problems you would expect. EVF image review in the finder is nice, but not really that accurate as to detail. It does let you know you got the shot though. I turn the LCD except to image review so I can't comment on live view modes.
    Battery life is horrible. If you buy this camera you will need to buy spares and carry them if you are doing anything more than a couple of hours photo walk.
    You are zooming with your feet. If you shoot only 35mm or 50mm prime lenses this probably won't bother you. If you uses zooms for anything this is not your camera or at least not your main camera.
    The subjective factor. Despite some frustrating issues and lack of responsiveness that I am used to, I do like this camera and think 4 stars is about right. There really is a form factor that I really enjoy and it is a very pretty machine (if you like cameras). Honestly even at a nearly 1/2 it's price new it is a little hard for me to justify objectively as for me it will be a secondary/niche camera. Having said that I don't plan to return it. For carefully composed shots it is a wonderful camera. Most reviews state this is not a beginners camera and I will repeat that. It definitely demands that you give full attention to composition, and think about your shot before the camera comes up to your eye, which is by no means a bad thing. I would not label it a DSLR killer and I think those who do either have a specific style of shooting that plays to this cameras strengths or are getting caught up in the subjective experience. On the other hand if you are in the market for a compact camera that can produce professional results (IF you put in the effort) this is a good buy. Be aware that it is a demanding camera to use.
    Update: After using this for a couple of weeks I am getting used to this camera's quirks. It does really well with Black and White,to the point I shoot mostly everything in BW jpg, with RAW files enabled for converting shots to back to color. Night shooting is OK if you are out and about and run across something, but if you have something specific in mind, I would carry a DSLR for the increased capabilities. As long it is jacket weather I can carry this pretty much anywhere without worrying about a strap or carrying a bag, though it does bulge a bit. The OVF and EVF menus can be glitchy. The main focus point has no problems, but some of the secondary information options sometimes disappear. The histogram does not apparently work in OVF though it seems fine in EVF. It is super easy to accidentally move the shutter speed and exposure compensation dials without noticing so you have to watch your values to make sure nothing got changed before you shoot. Because of the lens set up you really have to keep it protected. To get around carrying the lens cap everywhere, I bought a cheap after market lens hood (I used JJC), removed the hood from the screw on assembly, and placed a cheap 49mm UV filter. Voila no more dealing with the lens cap. The lens profile is only slightly longer, and it still fits in my jacket pocket and looks nice.
  • 2014-03-23 07:00
    Not going to replace my DSLR but interesting., CameraBuff
    I have only had this camera a couple of days, and have been using firmware 2.01. Initial thoughts:
    Not going to replace s DSLR, at least not for me. This does not have the versatility, speed or ease of use in manual and semi-automatic modes. Having said that the image quality from carefully composed shots is comparable to my D7000.
    While not quite compact it is much less to carry than a DSLR. It won't fit in a pants pocket but will fit in a jacket pocket. Ladies can put it in a purse. For guys a strap, belt pouch or back pack (with LOTS of extra room left) would be in order if it is too hot for a jacket. I use a wrist strap and carrying it around for about half a day in my hand was no problem, except of course when I needed to use that hand for something else. I mainly got this for those times where I said to myself "I wish I had my camera" but wouldn't be carrying a DSLR.
    Even at firmware 2.01 the AF is painfully slow and made me miss shots waiting for lock. I have read that there are some tricks around this involving using the manual focus mode, but at least out of the box it is not reliable for fleeting shots. Snap shots pretty much turn out awful, beyond what would be expected from lack of compositional thought.
    Closer than about 4 feet you have to engage Macro mode. This is frustrating and once again results in lost shots if you are not prepared.
    Low light capability is APS-C, DSLR quality. You will not get full frame performance obviously, but for a camera this size I was surprised how well it handled subway tunnels. I have not tried night shooting it yet. Indoors is very good.
    The photography experience is truly modern retro rather than a modern camera with retro clothes. It is a bit hard to explain, but the Aperture and shutter speed controls are retro in a functional and also attractive way, while the modern components do not feel like they were shoe horned into an older film body (e.g. the Nikon Df.) I did not find it jarring to use retro manual controls in combination with modern control features. Everything does feel like it was designed with the over all experience in mind.
    The optical viewfinder is ingenious. The EVF is ok but has the problems you would expect. EVF image review in the finder is nice, but not really that accurate as to detail. It does let you know you got the shot though. I turn the LCD except to image review so I can't comment on live view modes.
    Battery life is horrible. If you buy this camera you will need to buy spares and carry them if you are doing anything more than a couple of hours photo walk.
    You are zooming with your feet. If you shoot only 35mm or 50mm prime lenses this probably won't bother you. If you uses zooms for anything this is not your camera or at least not your main camera.
    The subjective factor. Despite some frustrating issues and lack of responsiveness that I am used to, I do like this camera and think 4 stars is about right. There really is a form factor that I really enjoy and it is a very pretty machine (if you like cameras). Honestly even at a nearly 1/2 it's price new it is a little hard for me to justify objectively as for me it will be a secondary/niche camera. Having said that I don't plan to return it. For carefully composed shots it is a wonderful camera. Most reviews state this is not a beginners camera and I will repeat that. It definitely demands that you give full attention to composition, and think about your shot before the camera comes up to your eye, which is by no means a bad thing. I would not label it a DSLR killer and I think those who do either have a specific style of shooting that plays to this cameras strengths or are getting caught up in the subjective experience. On the other hand if you are in the market for a compact camera that can produce professional results (IF you put in the effort) this is a good buy. Be aware that it is a demanding camera to use.
  • 2014-03-13 07:00
    Could be a DSLR killer for some..., M. Mauldin
    Verified Purchase(
    This camera could be a DSLR killer for some users. I bought mine used and have really enjoyed it. I usually shoot with my Canon 60D but have found this to be so much easier to carry around. It is an entirely different kind of system and took some getting use to but I am not regretting my purchase at all.
  • 2014-03-13 07:00
    Could be a DSLR killer for some..., M. Mauldin
    This camera could be a DSLR killer for some users. I bought mine used and have really enjoyed it. I usually shoot with my Canon 60D but have found this to be so much easier to carry around. It is an entirely different kind of system and took some getting use to but I am not regretting my purchase at all.
  • 2014-03-12 07:00
    Almost perfect...but one flaw., Studio Orange
    Let's get this out of the way first: I love this camera. My rating would be 4 1/2 stars if Amazon allowed it.
    Image quality is out of this world. My main camera is a Canon 5D Mark III and this little Fuji gives it a run for its money. I'd even go so far to say that the Fuji slaps the Canon down hard when it comes to nailing the color with auto white balance. Sure, white balance is simple to fix when shooting in RAW, but it's an extra step and the Fuji gets it right more often than not.
    However, by far the best thing about this camera is that Fuji has continued to support it. Upon releasing the x100s, it would have been easy to "pull and Apple" and just sort of forget this thing existed, encouraging customers to upgrade. But no. Fuji developed a firmware upgrade that address not only addressed frustrations (such as the sloppy manual focus ring), but added completely new functionality to the camera (focus peaking).
    I'd go so far as to say that with the latest firmware, there is very little incentive to choose the x100 over the x100s for *most* people. That's a pretty bold move for Fuji, but it shows their commitment to their customers.
    The x100 is an incredibly fun camera to use, but it should be understood that it isn't the most versatile thing on the planet. It's a fixed focal length lens, which I love, but others might be put off by it. This thing may be the size of the point and shoot, but it's more related to a Micro 4/3 or DSLR in terms of user involvement in the photo taking process.
    For all of the praise, I'm not blind to the camera's quirks. The menu system isn't the most intuitive, and the button / dial layout will take a little getting used to. This is definitely not a camera to be in an excessive hurry with. But these quirks really don't take away from the overall enjoyment of using the camera.
    So... About that "one flaw" I mentioned in the title of this review. I think it's kind of a big deal, and so far as I know, it's a flaw that DOES carry over to the x100s...
    In my experience, it is far, far, far too easy to accidentally bump the power switch when traveling with the camera.
    Here's the thing: 99% of the time when you're USING the camera, you'll want to turn it on and forget about it. When you aren't using it, it will go to "sleep" to protect your battery and will wake up with any press of a button. No big deal.
    But if you toss the camera into a bag (or even a pocket -- yes, it will fit in a jacket pocket), what you DO NOT want is the power switch accidentally turning to the "on" position, and then random button presses draining your battery so that the camera is dead when you want / need to use it.
    I do get that the placement of the power switch was intended to be an ergonomic advantage. However, like I said, when you are actually using the camera, there's no real need to keep turning it on and off. You only need it off for long term storage or transport, and in that case, you want it to STAY off until you need it.
    So given that, I'd much rather have seen the power switch moved to a different, less prone to being bumped, location. Maybe even a lock button that needs to be pressed to slide the switch.
    But that's the only complaint against an otherwise fantastic camera.
  • 2014-03-07 08:00
    for the hipsters, Michael Ng
    Verified Purchase(
    Its a fun little camera and the hybrid viewfinder is really neat. Its my new go-to travel/ everyday camera. I don't always want to lug around my heavy dSLR with my heavy lenses for "fun casual" shooting.
    image quality is decent enough. Not the best at low light but that's comparing it to my pro level DSLR. It's fine for what it is. I mainly wanted this to do some street photography and didn't want an intimidating looking camera scaring my subjects. Its very quiet too! The "leaf" shutter is amazing. My main gripe is how slow the processor is and the burst mode: fuhgetaboutit. Processing a 5 frame burst felt like it isn't worth it. In a way, this has forced me to slow down and be meticulous about my shots which isn't necessarily bad. Also the autofocus is slow and trying to focus something even sorta close is a struggle at times. Turning on macro is a helpful little life hack for this camera. Seriously, at 23mm (its more something like a 35mm equivalent on a regular SLR) shouldn't be that difficult even at f/2. Oh and the menu is organized all wacky. Prepare to do a lot of deep menu digging and scrolling to find inconveniently placed setting controls. Needs more customizable buttons in my opinion.
    Warning for those that aren't photo geeks or professional photographers: this might be too advanced/confusing to use for a compact point and shoot. You definitely have to have some knowledge of cameras to make good use of this camera. Even I had to take a day or two to figure out completely where everything is to change the settings to the way I want it and I do photography professionally.
    Its stylish for sure and as useful as it is as a camera, its also become part of my fashion accessory.
  • 2014-03-07 08:00
    for the hipsters, Michael Ng
    Its a fun little camera and the hybrid viewfinder is really neat. Its my new go-to travel/ everyday camera. I don't always want to lug around my heavy dSLR with my heavy lenses for "fun casual" shooting.
    image quality is decent enough. Not the best at low light but that's comparing it to my pro level DSLR. It's fine for what it is. I mainly wanted this to do some street photography and didn't want an intimidating looking camera scaring my subjects. Its very quiet too! The "leaf" shutter is amazing. My main gripe is how slow the processor is and the burst mode: fuhgetaboutit. Processing a 5 frame burst felt like it isn't worth it. In a way, this has forced me to slow down and be meticulous about my shots which isn't necessarily bad. Also the autofocus is slow and trying to focus something even sorta close is a struggle at times. Turning on macro is a helpful little life hack for this camera. Seriously, at 23mm (its more something like a 35mm equivalent on a regular SLR) shouldn't be that difficult even at f/2. Oh and the menu is organized all wacky. Prepare to do a lot of deep menu digging and scrolling to find inconveniently placed setting controls. Needs more customizable buttons in my opinion.
    Warning for those that aren't photo geeks or professional photographers: this might be too advanced/confusing to use for a compact point and shoot. You definitely have to have some knowledge of cameras to make good use of this camera. Even I had to take a day or two to figure out completely where everything is to change the settings to the way I want it and I do photography professionally.
    Its stylish for sure and as useful as it is as a camera, its also become part of my fashion accessory.
  • 2014-02-24 08:00
    Love the build, the look, the feel...but..., S. R. Kimball
    Verified Purchase(
    The handling was terrible, the buttons and dials are really fiddly and not positive feeling at all. I wanted to love it, but compared to my X-E1, I just had to admit, I really did not like using the X100.
  • 2014-02-24 08:00
    Love the build, the look, the feel...but..., S. R. Kimball
    The handling was terrible, the buttons and dials are really fiddly and not positive feeling at all. I wanted to love it, but compared to my X-E1, I just had to admit, I really did not like using the X100.
  • 2014-02-13 08:00
    Fantastic Images, WolfWolf
    Verified Purchase(
    We are spoiled when it comes to cameras now. There are a million great choices with better ones coming out seemingly every week. Why would you get this camera or the new X100s rather than one that is faster at focusing, has interchangeable lenses, or all the other features you may think you want? I would say simplicity and image quality. With this it is all you have, and all you have to worry about. No additional lenses. Heck, no additional focal lengths through zoom even, so you get used to seeing the world through a 35mm lens (same equivalent as the iPhone for reference). It is also super simple to use. I hear people call it complicated, or you should be a professional photographer to really use it. This is silly. I have never seen a camera have such flawless exposure and white balance. You never really have to fiddle with it. All you do it take pictures and they turn out looking great, easy! All the controls are right there on physical knobs (except ISO, boo Fuji) rather than some toggle or wheel. Again, easy. It is not quick so you have to be a little deliberate but this is far from a bad thing to me.
    Image quality. Ok, the whole point of having a camera is to capture images of course. This above all else is where it shines. I love the colors and feel of what this camera puts out. People are consistently impressed when they see the pictures. This is right out of the camera, no adjustments from me. That is the really wonderful thing. Maybe I will crop here or there but I am not spending my time having to tweak them. I have friends that take deep pride in their post processing (for good reason since they put out amazing work) but that is not for me. I love to just take pictures and capture moments. This camera, and I am sure its older brother, let me do just that and have truly amazing results.
    Oh, and yes, it feels super high quality since it is all metal, the lens is amazing, the hybrid viewfinder feels like it is from the future, the flash sink does amazing things, and the shutter is basically silent. Love this camera. To me, expensive but not overpriced by any means.
  • 2014-02-13 08:00
    Fantastic Images, WolfWolf
    We are spoiled when it comes to cameras now. There are a million great choices with better ones coming out seemingly every week. Why would you get this camera or the new X100s rather than one that is faster at focusing, has interchangeable lenses, or all the other features you may think you want? I would say simplicity and image quality. With this it is all you have, and all you have to worry about. No additional lenses. Heck, no additional focal lengths through zoom even, so you get used to seeing the world through a 35mm lens (same equivalent as the iPhone for reference). It is also super simple to use. I hear people call it complicated, or you should be a professional photographer to really use it. This is silly. I have never seen a camera have such flawless exposure and white balance. You never really have to fiddle with it. All you do it take pictures and they turn out looking great, easy! All the controls are right there on physical knobs (except ISO, boo Fuji) rather than some toggle or wheel. Again, easy. It is not quick so you have to be a little deliberate but this is far from a bad thing to me.
    Image quality. Ok, the whole point of having a camera is to capture images of course. This above all else is where it shines. I love the colors and feel of what this camera puts out. People are consistently impressed when they see the pictures. This is right out of the camera, no adjustments from me. That is the really wonderful thing. Maybe I will crop here or there but I am not spending my time having to tweak them. I have friends that take deep pride in their post processing (for good reason since they put out amazing work) but that is not for me. I love to just take pictures and capture moments. This camera, and I am sure its older brother, let me do just that and have truly amazing results.
    Oh, and yes, it feels super high quality since it is all metal, the lens is amazing, the hybrid viewfinder feels like it is from the future, the flash sink does amazing things, and the shutter is basically silent. Love this camera. To me, expensive but not overpriced by any means.
  • 2014-01-29 08:00
    x100 is a winner, Bobbie Lee
    Verified Purchase(
    purchased the x100 used from Amazon. great product. firmware update was easily accomplished. the image quality from the camera is really good. I typically shoot raw but the times i've shot JPEG have also resulted in very good pics. there is a great advantage in having a small light camera that you can bring along with you about anywhere. also, the x100 being small it doesn't seem to scare off as many people when i bring it up to my eye. I typically shoot using the viewfinder. Having an electronic as well as an optical viewfinder is really a treat (along with the ability to aim and shoot relying on the LCD).
    as compared to a DSLR, the advantage of the x100 is small form factor. the disadvantage is that the x100 takes more time to lock focus, even with firmware 2.01. when shooting speed is of the essence, I would rather have my full frame Canon 5D instead. Otherwise, this is a great camera. don't know how much better the x100s is, but for the much reduced price i purchased the x100 used for , i would say keep your money and go with the x100, or alternatively, pick up a used x100 as well as a used Canon 5d (original - not MK II, not MK III), along with a nifty fifty (50mm F/1.8 MK I or MK II) and you'll spend just a little more than a new x100s. that way you've have both a high end point and shoot as well as pretty darn good full frame DSLR. happy shooting!
  • 2014-01-29 08:00
    x100 is a winner, Bobbie Lee
    purchased the x100 used from Amazon. great product. firmware update was easily accomplished. the image quality from the camera is really good. I typically shoot raw but the times i've shot JPEG have also resulted in very good pics. there is a great advantage in having a small light camera that you can bring along with you about anywhere. also, the x100 being small it doesn't seem to scare off as many people when i bring it up to my eye. I typically shoot using the viewfinder. Having an electronic as well as an optical viewfinder is really a treat (along with the ability to aim and shoot relying on the LCD).
    as compared to a DSLR, the advantage of the x100 is small form factor. the disadvantage is that the x100 takes more time to lock focus, even with firmware 2.01. when shooting speed is of the essence, I would rather have my full frame Canon 5D instead. Otherwise, this is a great camera. don't know how much better the x100s is, but for the much reduced price i purchased the x100 used for , i would say keep your money and go with the x100, or alternatively, pick up a used x100 as well as a used Canon 5d (original - not MK II, not MK III), along with a nifty fifty (50mm F/1.8 MK I or MK II) and you'll spend just a little more than a new x100s. that way you've have both a high end point and shoot as well as pretty darn good full frame DSLR. happy shooting!
  • 2014-01-13 08:00
    Awesome camera, but you need to understand what you're buying, Steve
    Verified Purchase(
    Ok, it was expensive, but read the reviews. Indoor photos with and without flash are consistently better than my Nikon D7000 with both 35mm prime and 18-200mm. It's the natural lighting and color balance that differentiate it. Also excellent for outdoor, and when you want the smaller form factor, this is great. The silent operation is also a real plus for inside churches, etc.
  • 2014-01-13 08:00
    Awesome camera, but you need to understand what you're buying, Steve
    Ok, it was expensive, but read the reviews. Indoor photos with and without flash are consistently better than my Nikon D7000 with both 35mm prime and 18-200mm. It's the natural lighting and color balance that differentiate it. Also excellent for outdoor, and when you want the smaller form factor, this is great. The silent operation is also a real plus for inside churches, etc.
  • 2014-01-06 08:00
    Great for its intended purpose, Lubos Bosak
    Verified Purchase(
    My wife wanted this as a travel camera which still takes professional-grade pictures. It is smaller and lighter than her DSLRs and after a bit of learning curve she's happy with the pictures. She's ben using it for several weeks now and loves it.