Canon T3i 18.0 Megapixel Digital SLR Reviews Roundup

Canon announces two new entry-level DSLRs, the EOS Rebel T3i (aka 600D) and EOS Rebel T3 (aka 1100D). The Canon Rebel T3i comes with a 18 Megapixels CMOS sensor and a 3-inch vari-angle LCD display. It support capturing of video in full HD 1920 x 1080 resolution at 24p, 25p, or 30p. What's more, the T3i digitally provides additional zoom power without sacrificing quality. The new Movie Digital Zoom feature allows 3x to 10x magnification while shooting Full HD video. Unlike standard digital zoom for still images, Movie Digital Zoom crops the video image directly from the CMOS sensor at Full HD resolution to preserve video quality and still provide additional telephoto power beyond just the lens.

The Canon EOS T3i DSLR camera is scheduled to be available in the beginning of March, and will be sold in a body-only configuration at an estimated retail price of $799.99. It will also be offered in a kit version with Canon's new EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS II zoom lens at an estimated retail price of $899.99. There is also a second kit version with Canon's EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS zoom lens at an estimated retail price of $1099.00.
The Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR camera is scheduled to be available in early March, and will be sold in a body-only configuration at an estimated retail price of $799.99. It will also be offered in a kit version with Canon's EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS zoom lens at an estimated retail price of $899.99.

Canon EOS Rebel T3i Sample Photos on Flickr



Canon EOS Rebel T3i Camera Reviews Roundup


DPI - Nov 27 2011
"The Canon Rebel T3i, also known as the Canon EOS 600D, is an entry-level digital SLR that's definitely worth a look. The camera is an evolutionary step up from the Rebel T2i (EOS 550D) but introduces a handful of appreciated features such as the rotating 3 inch display, wireless flash control and improved Auto mode. The Rebel T3i has the usual SLR features..." More »
Not Rated
BJP - Aug 22 2011
"The 600D also offers full manual control of shutter and aperture, defaulting to an auto ISO when this is selected and, like the more expensive 60D, has the option to adjust stereo audio input over 64 levels with a graphic display in 22 steps from -40dB to 0. Although Canon's official line is that the stereo 3.5mm 5v phantom-powered jack input is for microph..." More »
Not Rated
Imaging Resource - Aug 16 2011
"Like the Canon 60D, the T3i is a great choice for family to enthusiast photographers. If you're happy shooting natural light and have no intention of tuning your lenses, you won't notice that neither the T3i nor 60D has the Microfocus adjustment or an X-sync terminal (if you have no idea what those are, again, you probably won't miss them). The 3.7 fps fram..." More »
Not Rated
RegHardware - Jul 30 2011
"Canon must be feeling the pressure as Nikon gradually rolls out H.264 video across its DSLRs, but the 600D holds its own nonetheless. You can shoot at 25 or 24fps in 1080p mode, or 50fps in 720p mode, with a 'legacy' 640 x 480 mode for masochists. Video quality is superb, with the only disappointment that Canon still hasn't made progress when it comes..." More »
80out of 100
TechRadar - Jun 17 2011
"Although the 600D's focusing speed is generally good, the meagre burst rate and slow down upon processing mean that it's perhaps not the ideal camera for action photography. It's also probably not ideal for larger handed users, but otherwise there's little to complain about. The various changes bestowed upon the 600D perhaps make a little more sense he..." More »
80out of 100
BobAtkins - Jun 15 2011
"The Canon Digital Rebel T3i is the logical development of Canon's current DSLR philosophy which differentiates cameras by features rather than by image quality. In the current EOS DSLR lineup the Rebel T2i, Rebel T3i, EOS 60D and EOS 7D all use the same 18MP sensor and they all have essentially identical image quality. The Canon EOS Rebel T3i is the top-of-..." More »
Not Rated
PhotographyBay - Jun 11 2011
"As a video-capable DSLR, the Rebel T3i is probably the most capable and user-friendly camera in its class.  It offers a whole lot of options for video resolution and frame rates.  You get 1920 x 1080 at 24p, 25p or 30p.  Additionally, you can shoot 50p and 60p at 1280 x 720 resolution. One of the surprise new features in movie mode was t..." More »
Not Rated
CNET UK - Jun 05 2011
"As for photos, the 600D is equipped with a large, APS-C-sized image sensor with an 18-megapixel resolution. An advanced 14-bit image processor, ultra-high ISO sensitivity -- up to a theoretical ISO 12,800 -- and a nine-point autofocus round out its specs. Unless you leave the lens cap on, it's pretty easy to take a decent photo. The 600D provides plent..." More »
90out of 100
Steve's Digicam - May 06 2011
"The fact that the T3i is able to produce beautiful photos is no surprise, due to the fact that it encompasses the same image sensor and processor combination found on its predecessor; along with other EOS models. With 18-megapixels, your printing options are almost endless. Whether you're printing your typical 4x6-inch, or huge poster sized photos, the T3i..." More »
Not Rated
MacWorld - Apr 29 2011
"With either kit lens, the 18-55mm or the 18-135mm, the Canon T3i provides excellent image quality in terms of sharpness and detail. If you're tempted to upgrade to the 18-135mm kit lens for its extended zoom range (29-216mm in 35mm terms), then it's probably worth the bump in price. But in terms of image quality, the 18-55mm holds its own nicely against the..." More »
90out of 100
Digital Camera Resource Page - Apr 28 2011
"As with its predecessor, the Rebel T3i has a nice mix of features for both beginners and more advanced users. Beginners can choose from a new Scene Intelligent Auto mode (which doesn't actually tell you what scene it's using) or a Creative Auto mode (which lets you adjust "ambiance" or "background blur" with ease). Canon has added some h..." More »
Not Rated
Digital Camera Info - Apr 21 2011
"With three other cameras in the Canon family that feature this same 18MP APS-C sensor system, there really isn't a lot that surprised us about the T3i. It showed incremental improvements in its ability to handle noise in still images and video, with slightly improved dynamic range. We found in long exposures, Canon has found a way to improve color accuracy..." More »
79out of 100
Trusted Reviews - Apr 20 2011
"It's possible to use the two contrast-detect AF modes while recording movies, but it's not a great user experience, being both incredibly slow and quite noisy - the latter being something the camera's built-in microphone is sure to pick up. With a bit of practice you'll get far better results by switching AF off altogether and using the manual focus ring on..." More »
80out of 100
ePhotoZine - Apr 15 2011
"Feels good, looks good, takes stunning photos. What more could you want? Sure it would be nice if there was more warning about the battery giving up, and it would be nice if the continuous shooting mode was a little quicker, but these are minor niggles compared to a camera that delivers an excellent all round package, and offers good value for money as well..." More »
90out of 100
Camera Labs - Apr 03 2011
"The EOS 600D / Rebel T3i continues a strategy started with the EOS 60D, where Canon slots a new camera in-between existing ones, rather than directly replacing a specific model. As such the EOS 600D / T3i slots between the EOS 550D / Rebel T2i and the EOS 60D, narrowing their feature gap. While frustrating for people who desire greater innovation, it's..." More »
88out of 100
dpreview - Apr 01 2011
"The JPEG output is the standard Canon performance - colors closer to punchy than neutral and rather crunchy sharpening giving strongly defined edges. It's not a look that's to everyone's tastes, of course, but it does help give the images a bit more impact - which is exactly what many users at this level will be looking for. Of course it can be toned-down i..." More »
77out of 100
PhotoReview Australia - Mar 29 2011
"Not surprisingly, the performance of the review camera was similar to that of the EOS 550D, although our Imatest evaluations showed the EOS 660D delivered slightly higher resolution overall with both JPEG and CR2.RAW files. High ISO resolution was somewhat better that we found in our tests of the EOS 550D, particularly with JPEG files. Autofocusing was..." More »
85out of 100
Digital Camera Review - Mar 29 2011
"While Canon's pro body lineup turns over in a more leisurely fashion, the entry-level lineup now has six offerings including the T3i "flagship" that replaces the former flagship T2i after only a year on the market. To be sure, there are features that differentiate the two, notably the full HD video capability and an articulating monitor. But with..." More »
80out of 100
infoSync - Mar 25 2011
"The Canon EOS Rebel T3i inherits the same 18-megapixel APS-C sized CMOS sensor with Digic 4 processing from last year's T2i. Therefore, we really didn't experience any changes in the still image department. We get the ability to shoot in RAW, and the giant dimensions of the 18-megapixel images makes them highly conducive to crops. Overall, the highlight of..." More »
83out of 100
CNET US - Mar 23 2011
"Overall, the T3i has an excellent noise profile, unsurprisingly similar to that of the 60D's. JPEGs look very clean up through ISO 400, and even at ISO 800 you really have to scrutinize to see the beginnings of detail degradation; at ISO 1600 the noise becomes more obvious but still isn't too bad. ISO 400 is sort of my tipping-point sensitivity; to sho..." More »
70out of 100
Pocket-lint - Mar 23 2011
"The 600D's images are the icing on the cake. Image noise is well-controlled and JPEG images straight from the camera exhibit little to no interfering image grain from ISO 100-800. Noise reduction does begin to soften images hereafter, though it's only really the top-end ISO 12,800 extension option that struggles considerably. Shooting in RAW allows for grea..." More »
90out of 100
Photography BLOG - Mar 23 2011
"The Canon EOS 600D / Rebel T3i further blurs the lines between consumer and prosumer DSLR, offering the portability of the former with some of the advanced features of the latter. The vari-angle LCD is the most welcome addition, making perfect sense on a camera that will potentially be used by all the family for both stills and video alike. It may not be th..." More »
90out of 100
CNET AU - Mar 22 2011
"We tested the 600D primarily with the kit 18-135mm lens but it also comes in a range of other kit configurations including a more standard 18-55mm. As the sensor and image processor of the 550D and 600D is identical, image quality is exactly the same. What this means to photographers who haven't experienced the 550D is excellent colour rendition and noise c..." More »
85out of 100
Digital Camera Review - Mar 15 2011
"The T3i starts up quickly (Canon claims 0.1 second) and auto focused quickly for stills in the morning gloom, but the same could not be said for AF in video capture. The T3i was reluctant to acquire focus for movies in the gloomy morning light, in some cases settling into a series of going back and forth from close focus to infinity without acquiring. The T..." More »
Not Rated
Amateur Photographer - Feb 08 2011
"What was 'green square' mode has, in the Canon EOS 600D, become Scene Intelligent Auto - a mode that analyses the brightness and colours of what it is looking at to determine what the subject and setting is, and which then enhances colours, white balance and exposure accordingly.  While most manufacturers will link this kind of analysis to a collection..." More »
Not Rated
dpreview - Feb 08 2011
"In the past we've not been big fans of Canon's entry-level models in terms of handling; since the EOS 350D they've been afflicted by a tiny, slim grips that seem to have been designed for the smallest of hands. The 600D finally addresses this with a grip that's slightly deeper, front to back, than its predecessor's, coupled with a sculpted channel on the ba..." More »
Not Rated
Imaging Resource - Feb 07 2011
"I liked the Canon T3's swivel screen, though I confess that I forgot to use it more often than not; indeed, shooting in Live View mode still doesn't often occur to me, even though I use mirrorless cameras about half the time these days. When I feel an SLR in my hand, I naturally want to bring it to my eye to compose images. I am certain, though, that I woul..." More »
Not Rated
PhotoRadar - Feb 07 2011
"Photographers who are tempted by the EOS 60D's articulated screen but who cannot justify (or afford) the Canon 60D price, or even those who want a slightly smaller camera, will be thrilled by the fact that the Canon 600D has the same LCD screen. Articulated screens improve handling for video shooting, although it's a shame there's no level to keep horizons..." More »
Not Rated

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3650 user reviews


User Review of the camera - Canon EOS Rebel T3i

  • 2014-10-18 07:00
    Five Stars, amith
    Verified Purchase(
    Great Investment.. I have taken tons of pictures and the camera still performs flawlessly..
  • 2014-10-13 07:00
    Awesome, Candy
    Verified Purchase(
    Awesome camera I love it! I use it a lot at Magic kingdom for festival of fantasy
  • 2014-10-13 07:00
    Five Stars, James F. Tate "jft310"
    Verified Purchase(
    Perfect
  • 2014-10-13 07:00
    Thumbs up!, edward gonzalez
    Verified Purchase(
    The pictures taken from this camera are unreal!
    I took the time to read the manual and learn some of the settings. I took this camera to our Lake Tahoe vacation and we got some amazing shots and video!
    I truly recommend taking 10-30 minutes going through the manual and learning some of the details, it's worth the time.
  • 2014-10-13 07:00
    Great camera! Wonderful pictures even from this, Mark H.
    Verified Purchase(
    Great camera! Wonderful pictures even from this amature
  • 2014-10-12 07:00
    Nice Design And Fitting Color, Izzy Kahn "Iz"
    I may not know how to use it now, but I have heard that this is the best and most affordable DSLR. I like how simple it looks and it looks great with its black body and lens. This camera came with a lot of goodies too. I know that when I take a mandatory photography class for my major that I will learn how to properly wield and use a camera and that It will be a great experience!
  • 2014-10-11 07:00
    Five Stars, Pierre Jourdan
    Verified Purchase(
    very good offer, for a very good camera.
    even when beginner, doing great shots
  • 2014-10-11 07:00
    The best DSLR for any purpose., iGio
    This camera produces excellent image quality. It is easy to use. The best DSLR for any purpose.
  • 2014-10-11 07:00
    Perfect, Guilherme P.
    Verified Purchase(
    Perfect Camera!!
  • 2014-10-10 07:00
    Five Stars, C
    Verified Purchase(
    Great camera
  • 2014-10-10 07:00
    Great camera for anyone., AK
    Verified Purchase(
    Love it.
  • 2014-10-09 07:00
    Great Camera - Average Documentation, Pinfold
    Verified Purchase(
    Absolutely love it - but having better documentation for folks new to DSLRs would be appreciated.
  • 2014-10-09 07:00
    Five Stars, tayhines
    Verified Purchase(
    excellent camera!
  • 2014-10-08 07:00
    Love the clarity and multiple settings, A
    Verified Purchase(
    Most precious thing I have ever bought. Love the clarity and multiple settings. It is perfect!
  • 2014-10-07 07:00
    Canon EOS Rebel T3i, BIGFOOTDWR
    Verified Purchase(
    Love this camera so far. I've had point & shoot digital cameras since switching from 35mm and missed the manual operation with point & shoot cameras. Those cameras let you do some manual adjustments, but there is nothing like an DSLR for better photography. This camera with the 18-135mm lens is pretty heavy and long, so make sure you want to carry this around. For years on vacation the digital point & shoot cameras have fit in my pockets or wife's purse, so toting a bigger camera can get tiring in some situations. I like that I can change lenses too, so in the future I will buy longer zooms. But this lens is great because it goes from wide, to normal 50mm, to 135 zoom, which covers several lenses. The total length camera and lens (without zooming) is about 7 1/4" and weighs 2.34 lbs.
  • 2014-10-07 07:00
    The sensors just seemed more precise and I embarked on finding the best Canon deal I could find where I'd be able ..., Scott C. Meeker
    I've been a filmmaker since age 4 1/2, seriously, I have proof. :) I have also been totally nuts about cameras and photography as a whole since as long as I can honestly remember. Nikon and Minolta had always been the brands I swore by. I had a Canon video camera which was "meh." I decided one day to sell all my gear and invest in DSLR. It came down to Nikon or Canon and overall, I was surprisingly mostly impressed by Canon. The sensors just seemed more precise and I embarked on finding the best Canon deal I could find where I'd be able to get three cameras for the best video coverage. The T3i is where I setteld and for 6 months I have been beating the heck out of these cameras, with no adverse events. I can't stress enough, just how well this thing performs and how happy I am with both stills and video. I don't like big long reviews, so I'll just ask you to trust me, this camera is as fast and as good as I need it to be and I'm extremely picky.
    VERY HAPPY WITH THESE T3i CAMS!!! :) <------smiley.
  • 2014-10-07 07:00
    It's a good camera for beginner, Lindsay
    It's a good camera for beginner. Love it, and only cost me around $450, but now the price rise.
  • 2014-10-07 07:00
    Four Stars, D.M.
    Verified Purchase(
    Good choice
  • 2014-10-06 07:00
    Didnt like it hard to work., matthew j brinck
    Hard to work. My wife sold it and it was a gift. Oh well.
  • 2014-10-05 07:00
    Almost 1600 Amazon reviewers have made this camera the #1 Best Seller and for good reason., OldPhotoGuy
    Verified Purchase(
    The headline really sells and tells anyone questioning whether they should buy this camera as their first entry level DSLR. Or even their second or third DSLR if they want fabulous photos and videos with the ease of a top of the line point and shoot camera. Yes, you can be creative and mess with settings once you know how to use them, but this camera will give you great pics everytime, indoor and outdoors, on automatic pilot. Since the majority of close to 1600 reviewers (at this writing) have already disected this model for you and sung its praises, let me tell you a few things the others may have missed and what may save you some time and money zeroing in on the best bang for your buck. I've owned the now discontinued model before this, the Canon T3, for 3 years now and could not be more happy with it. I paid $399 for it at the time and today they sell for around $349 if you can find one new. Because I love cameras and 3 years can be a lifetime when it comes to electronics, I thought I would upgrade so I did a side by side comparison of the newer Canon T3i and the very highly rated Nikon D3300, now priced similar at around $550 on Amazon. The Nikon D3300 was a bit lighter and smaller, but I felt the build quality was significantly less than Canon's. Also that new retractable Nikon zoom lens was a nuisance to me as you had to remember to extend it or leave it extended to be ready for the next shot. In the extended mode, the lens seemed too long or top heavy to me compared to the Canon T3i and the zoom was not as smooth as the Canon's. I took numerous identical shots with both cameras as well as videos,and I personally liked the consistently brighter, color saturation of the Canon T3i over the Nikon D3300. Every Nikon shot was much darker using out of the box settings which is not my personal preference. I'm sure this could easily be tweaked and adjusted by a pro or reading the manual, but the people buying this level camera are usually not interested in fine tuning a complicated piece of equipment such as this. When it came to videos, picture and sound quality were fairly equal for both cameras, but only the Canon T3i has an articulating screen for grabbing those up high and down low and weird position shots for pics and video, a nice feature to have for sure. Incidentally, the Canon is 18 mp and the Nikon 24 mp but this really doesn't mean much to auto snapshooters if you're only going to view and exchange pics mostly on the computer or never enlarge a pic bigger than 16" x 20". I have often enlarged my the pics from my Canon T3 without a problem, and it's only 12 megapixels. So which camera did I choose to keep? Neither for now. If my Canon T3 was having problems, which it is not and never has, I would have definitely gone with the Canon T3i and enjoyed the articulating screen and a few more megapixels. However, it's heavier and bulkier than my T3 and more importantly, since I shoot a lot of video clips of the grandkids, the sound pick-up and quality of the T3i was noticeably not as loud or clear as my current T3. Don't know if this was a flaw of the one I got, but I assumed they all pick-up like that. That's the main reason I gave it 4 stars instead of 5. They need to fix that sound issue. So I could not justify putting out $550 for the upgrade when I like my still-going-strong T3 better. The new $500 Canon T5 is the new bottom of the consumer confusing Canon EOS Rebel line, but if you have your eyes set on that model, in my opinion, buy the T3i for $50 more and pick up the articulating screen for you videos. I really wanted to love that new Nikon D3300 which is the proclaimed entry level DSLR winner by many magazine reviews, but it just didn't impress me compared to the Canon.