Olympus E-PL1 12.3 Megapixel Digital SLR Reviews Roundup

Olympus have just launched the Olympus E-PL1, a new, affordable Micro Four Thirds camera with a built-in flash, sensor-shift image stabilisation and one-touch HD video recording. Sporting a stabilised 12.3-megapixel LiveMOS sensor, the Olympus E-PL1 weighs in at only 296 grams without a lens, battery or memory card. Speaking of which, the Olympus E-PL1 is compatible with SD and SDHC cards, just like the existing Micro Four Thirds offerings from Olympus and Panasonic.

Other highlights include a Supersonic Wave Filter for automated sensor cleaning, a sensitivity range of ISO 100-3200, 3fps continuous shooting for up to 10 raw images, HDMI and USB 2.0 connectivity, and auto gradation adjustment to prevent blown highlights and blocked-in shadows. The Olympus E-PL1 also features an easy-to-understand, non-technical Live Guide with simple direct control over key image effects. Available from March 2010 at a retail price of óG549 for a single lens kit and óG699 for a twin zoom kit, the Olympus E-PL1 is the most affordable Micro Four Thirds camera from Olympus to date.

Olympus E-PL1 Sample Photos on Flickr



Olympus E-PL1 Camera Reviews Roundup


Trusted Reviews - Aug 28 2010
"The E-PL1's overall performance is also more like that of an advanced compact than a DSLR. It starts up and is ready to shoot in just under two and a half seconds as long as you remember to manually extend the lens, and the shot-to-shot time in single-shot mode is approximately 1.8 seconds in both Raw and JPEG modes, both respectable times for a compact cam..." More »
90out of 100
Photoxels - Aug 16 2010
"The Olympus E-PL1 has very good image quality including very good low-light performance at ISO 100 with good detail preserved. Image quality is very good up to ISO 800, and ISO 1600 is very usable; at higher ISOs, images suffer from noise and loss of detail. One of the many advantages of a DIL camera is the ability to use interchangeable lenses suited..." More »
Not Rated
MacWorld - Aug 04 2010
"As per its lower price point, the E-PL1 is missing some features that you get from the E-P2. Maximum shutter speed caps at 1/2000th of a second, with maximum ISO stopping at 6400, though neither of these will matter much for most shooting situations. There is no orientation sensor in the camera, so it can't automatically rotate images when you shoot in port..." More »
60out of 100
RegHardware - Jul 23 2010
"The E-PL1 records AVI movies in HD at 1280 x 720 and in SD at 640 x 480, both at 30 frames per second. Maximum recording time is 7 minutes in HD and 14 minutes in VGA or 2GB maximum file size. The E-PL1 lets you shoot movies in Program or Aperture Priority mode or gives you complete control over exposure in Manual mode. It also allows the use of a zoom lens..." More »
85out of 100
NeutralDay - Jul 12 2010
"The E-PL1 in many ways gets more things right than any other PEN camera. It is cheaper, in feel and in cost, but doesn't actually skimp on any of the inherent power of either of its predecessors. Indeed, in many ways it maybe the superior camera, it handles better, provides a pop-up flash for fill and commanding other flashes, provides a dedicated video rec..." More »
80out of 100
Electronista - Jun 29 2010
"The Olympus E-PL1 is a worthy entry to the ILC ranks for those ready to step beyond the constraints of a typical point and shoot camera. Made for the type of person who chooses to go to the next step, but most likely not further, it offers great image capturing ability without all the bells and whistles that are part and parcel of DSLRs available today.&nbs..." More »
70out of 100
infoSync - Jun 12 2010
"If you remember our review of the Olympus E-620, we were jazzed with the DSLR's image quality. Well, the same applied here with the Olympus E-PL1. Beautifully rendered, natural colors, crisp, detailed lines, and an uncanny ability to stave off common image aberrations like fringing and noise. Even at ISO 1600, our images were great, though we'd recommend sh..." More »
80out of 100
Digital Camera Info - May 20 2010
"The E-PL1 still involves a number of trade-offs for potential buyers. Autofocus is not as fast as a digital SLR or high-quality point and shoot, a fact that may come as an unpleasant surprise to Little League Moms and Dads. Image quality is quite good in most respects, particularly when it comes to resolution, and lingering image noise problems will probabl..." More »
74out of 100
dpreview - May 18 2010
"There are, perhaps, three types of potential users who might find themselves considering purchasing the E-PL1, all of who will find things to love and things to be frustrated by in the camera. The first is the compact camera user who wants better images, might be interested in taking some control over the camera but doesn't want to learn about apertures and..." More »
69out of 100
CNET UK - May 11 2010
"The 720p high-definition movie mode is rather good too, because it offers full manual control over shutter speed, aperture and focusing. You have to remember to set the autofocus to continuous mode before you start shooting if you want to use it, and you have to dip into the menus to choose the exposure mode, but all that's quickly learned. The result is an..." More »
90out of 100
TechRadar - Apr 28 2010
"The Pen E-PL1 concept is fairly straightforward - it's a stripped down, easier-to-use version of a high-end camera which can be sold significantly cheaper. It's not the sexiest camera ever, but it really works. Olympus has succeeded in streamlining the PEN E-P2's feature set, while still building a camera with a strong purpose in its own right, which p..." More »
80out of 100
LetsGoDigital - Apr 21 2010
"On the inside, the Olympus E-PL1 resembles the other models in the PEN-series a lot, which is a positive thing. Just like the other models, the E-PL1 offers excellent quality. Noise only becomes a 'problem' in the highest ISO values, but normal sensitivities work well. In any case, it is a lot better than a compact camera. That is also true for the dynamic..." More »
83out of 100
Digital Camera Review - Apr 15 2010
"The Olympus E-PL1 is the cheapest of the Olympus Digital PEN cameras, rolling onto the scene with a 14-42mm kit lens and body for $599. The E-PL1 is compact, stylish and well-priced for its features. It has an image sensor that is larger than a point-and-shoot, and offers the ability to change different lenses. It also comes with most of the same specs as i..." More »
80out of 100
Engadget - Apr 09 2010
"Speaking of video, let's speak of video. We're pretty happy with what we see here. These Micro Four Thirds cameras are turning out to be some of the best ways of capturing video on the cheap known to man, and the E-PL1 turns around quality 720p footage on a budget. The biggest drawback, as pointed out elsewhere, is the audible auto focus noise made by the c..." More »
Not Rated
Steve Huff - Apr 08 2010
"Many of you know that I reviewed and LOVED the Olympus E-P1 and E-P2. I even bought the E-P2 over the Leica X1 due to my wife preferring the overall user experience of the E-P2 over the little Leica. Well, this is the Huff household and if a digital camera makes it for more than 2 months you know it is a winner but cameras come and go in this house and I lo..." More »
Not Rated
Digital Camera Resource Page - Mar 29 2010
"Photo quality was very good -- better than I expected, in fact. The E-PL1 exposes photos accurately, though like other Four Thirds cameras (Micro or regular), it does like to clip highlights. Colors are pleasing, and are especially vibrant if you're using the iEnhance Picture Mode. Images have the "smooth" look that you come to expect from a camer..." More »
Not Rated
PhotoReview Australia - Mar 29 2010
"High ISO performance was also better in the E-PL1 than we found with the E-P2. Interestingly there was little difference in the results we obtained with JPEG and ORF.RAW files, as shown in the graph below. (It will be interesting to re-run these tests on the raw files when the update of Adobe Camera Raw is released because we have some reservations about th..." More »
85out of 100
Photography BLOG - Mar 05 2010
"Importantly for the target audience, the E-PL1 is the first PEN to feature a built-in flash, very neatly implemented with a folding design that raise the unit above the lens and helps reduce red-eye. The new Live Guide is another beginner-friendly addition that makes understanding and changing apertures and shutter speeds to achieve creative effects very st..." More »
90out of 100
Pocket-lint - Mar 05 2010
"When it comes to shooting with the camera, the E-PL1 is fast and responsive, though it does take a brief moment to automatically determine focus and exposure, confirmed with an affirmative bleep. A blocky handgrip to the front enables a firm, steadying hold, yet as the on/off button is located slap bang next to the shutter release button, it's easy for your..." More »
80out of 100

DSLR Photography Latest Posts




 
913 user reviews


User Review of the camera - Olympus E-PL1

  • 2014-03-23 07:00
    Not worth the money, Stephen Csicsek
    I've had cheap cameras that took better pictures than this camera. Be careful of the advertising because that sucks you in.
  • 2014-02-04 08:00
    Not to shabby at all., Thomas Greber "thkpic"
    I like this little guy. Pair it with the 45mm 1.8 and BANG....in business. Focusing isn't particularly fast but whatever. For the original price I'd probably say pass, but at the price it goes for now...YES YES YES. 1/2000's shutter speed is limited but you can get the ISO down fairly low.
    As far as AF, it doesn't hunt to bad either. It does seem to get a little wonky sometimes and not recognize what I"m trying to focus on, but with the zoom and manual focus I can avoid those few "issues" here and there. It feels great in the hands and looks even better in person.
    If you get this I HIGHLY recommend getting one of Olympus' primes. There simply sublime and with a little post processing you can really do some interesting things. All and all, not a bad little camera and I find the user menu stupid easy. I can't believe I can actually blur the background out on my pics. It's a keeper...so much so I now have two!!!
    By the way, I shot full frame and have 2k lenses on the side as well. This doesn't replace that but the pics are dang impressive for what it is. GREAT walkaround if your not pushing it and casual use.
  • 2014-01-31 08:00
    A Big Dissapointment !!!, Frank
    Wanted this camera really bad and waited a year for the price to go down .. It's a BIG DISAPPOINTMENT .. The Camer is SUPER SLOW and the Video quality which they claim to be Professional quality "IS Not" I Hardly ever use this camera as its Performance is HORRBLE ! Wish I Never WASTED my Money on it. I'm sorry to say.
  • 2014-01-01 08:00
    like, lynne
    takes good pictures. i did not get a lens cover is that a separate order? i really dont have anything else to say thank you
  • 2013-12-13 08:00
    Good camera, but I prefer something smaller for travel., John R. Williamson
    The camera works great. I only have the one lens and it isn't enough zoom for me. Too bulky for me to carry around. I found it much harder to use than my Panasonic Lumix travel camera and I really didn't see any improvement in pictures over the Panasonic. I have stopped using this camera.
  • 2013-12-03 08:00
    No a bad camera, Fitz
    Not so great in low light . Also the camera is a little heavy for its size . Overall the camera is ok. I was influenced by the commercial
  • 2013-11-25 08:00
    Cheap fun to use and easy on my wallet, THE AUTISTIC WEREWOLF "Wolf"
    Nice little camera a baby step up from a basic point and shoot but not a full fledged DSLR. The camera is not great in low light but in all other ways the Olympus PEN E-PL1 12.3MP Live MOS Micro Four Thirds Interchangeable Lens meets my very basic needs. The camera was cheap fun to use and easy on my wallet. I took one star off due to lots of noise in low light. If you are outside or in a brightly lit room this camera is great.
  • 2013-11-23 08:00
    This is my DLSR, understand and learn its limitations, utilize its potential., Last of the Bohicans
    I am an older 35mm guy. My 1st camera was a 110 instamatic and then I got my hands on an upper end polaroid with bellows and a metal slider to put the film in to develop it. Hard to believe. I got my on-the-fly seat of the pants training on aperature, shutter, f-stops, ISO, ASA focal length, etc when I joined the Navy to see the world. I drug AE-1's. K1000sm and other 35mm SLR's thru deserts, jungles (urban and natural) and across the worlds oceans. I learned certain disciplines early, using a tripod and Fuji 100 with a polarizer I produced many, many postcard quality photos, ASA 400 for handheld work and ASA 800 and 1600 for night snapshots. My favorite setup was Yashica FX3 kit. It was full manual like a k1000 with very good 28mm, 50mm and 135 primes. For me it was the ultimate setup for lugging around on my travels. Later on when the family and life's demands a 35mm point and shoot auto became the snapshot camera for family uses. I remember seeing the 1st digital cameras and the writing on the wall. My 1st digital was a 3.2 MP Canon P&S that took excellent pictures. I purchased it because it had a viewfinder so I could use it in bright sunlight. I became familiar with Chinese manufacturer when the lens mechanism stopped driving the lens and opening the lens. Next was a Samsung NV10 which impressed me due to its metal body. I loved it, It took good photos. It only had an LCD and even with a Delkin Hood it was still difficult to compose a shot in bright sunlight. After 3 years and a couple of thousand snapshots the dreaded CCD blue line slow death started. I started to look for a more serious enthusiast camera that could help me seriously move into the digital era and carry on with the serious passion I had in my 35mm SLR days. Enter the E-PL1.
    I looked a the E-PL1 and decided the two zoom bundle would fit the bill nicely. I read the positive reviews and like the versatility of the two lenses. In figured the LCD was something I could assimilate to. Let me state now that many will disagree with my assessment of this camera but I stand by my findings and hope to help others of my age and experience make an educated assessment on the purchase this camera and determination of whether it will meet their needs. 1st off plan the price of the VF2 viewfinder with the eyecup if you are serious about composition. The LCD is just too difficult to see in bright sunlight. Plus being an old SLR guy holding the camera closer and firmly is a better discipline. Better yet purchase the VF4, it just a few bucks more. It will not be an upgrade on the E-PL1 but will be if you decide to upgrade to a 16MP pen such as the E-PL5. After I first purchased this camera and the VF2 viewfinder my niece was having her wedding and asked if I would do the photography. Using just the 14-42mm kit lens I arrived to find that her grandmother had already hired a photographer with Nikon DSLR's. I Shot photos anyhow and in the end many of the photos were better than the hired photographer took. This was handheld and in auto mode. About 50% of the photos were outstanding. The problems with the rest were due to serious backlighting issues causing underexposure of the subject areas. Also there were low light focusing issues where the camera could not focus or was out of focus. Had I understood the manual controls of the camera and been able to be where the photographer had been and using my Tripod the rest of the photos would have been stellar also. It was also a record 108 degrees and the camera functioned fabulously. It did go thru a couple a batteries so invest in extra aftermarket batteries with a wall charger. I can say with out a doubt you can use this camera at the professional level to shoot weddings if you understand and know how to utilize its potential. After becoming ill for a year and putting my resurgent photography hobby on hold I once again picked up the pen to learn its finer points. As a Brit once told me "You Yanks are ok but you never bother to read the bloody instructions". As such I highly recommend the E-PL1 for dummies book, it is well worth the money spent on it. Once you read this book and understand the E-PL1's potential it becomes pretty straight forward. From looking at a friends E-PM1 and E-PL3 it will help you navigate and understand other PEN menus also. I can comment or compare the E-PL1 menus compared to the brands because this is my 1st digital camera I have attempted to use manually. The key to using this camera manually is the Super Guide. I find using this operating the camera manually is very straight forward. At the time I purchased this camera I had no idea that you could purchase adapters to utilize legacy lenses. My biggest complaint with digital camera systems is the staggering cost of good prime lenses which is why I purchased with the 2 zoom bundle. I was overcome with joy as I had a large collection of K-mount bodies and lenses. I have selected a new Sigma 28-85mm I had in new condition in the box. a 28mm f 1.8 SMC-A Pentax, 50mm 1F1.2 SMC-M Pentax, and an excellent , super sharp new in the box Vivitar 135mm Series 1. These I already had. I purchased a used in new condition excellent Rokinon 70-200mm zoom for 20 bucks. The results with these legacy lenses have been excellent. Being an older person to me digital photos have what I call a digital look. This may be hard for some to understand but people my age reading this they will understand. It is like listening to stereo music in the old days with the old Marantz, Sansui, Fisher ball bearing analog stereo receivers, the digitally processed stereos sounded digital. To my old eyes the photos look digital and the legacy lenses make it look more film-like. While on the subject of using these legacy lenses remember that if you us IS make sure you set the focal length for the lens and figure in the crop factor, if not you will be working against yourself. If you are using a legacy zoom this will need to be changed as you vary the focal length. If you plan on changing focal lengths a lot you might fare better if you shut the IS off. Also remember that with any lens you use shut the IS off when using a tripod. I am of the opinion that if you are using the IS with legacy lenses and the focal length is incorrect the IS circuitry will be stressed because it will be constantly hunting for a solution it cannot achieve due to be fed incorrect data. The 4/3 lenses the focal length is fed to the body automatically thru the electrical contacts. Also make sure you figure in the crop factor. Of course these changes can be done reasonably fast using the super guide. Other anomalies to deal with when using legacy lenses with using adapters is that the legacy lenses put a lot of weight on the camera body when using a tripod. I was able to get an adapter on Amazon that has the tripod mount on the adapter so you can put the weight on the adapter and not the camera body. This is also beneficial in that you have to remove the camera off the tripod mount to change the battery or memory as they are accessed from the bottom of the camera. By mounting on the adapter you avoid this. The tripod mount capable legacy adapter is highly recommended. Also when using legacy adapters set the sharpness control to +1 on primes and +2 on zooms as a general rule for best focusing results. Experiment with each legacy lense to finds its sweet spot. Others have told me that you can process this out later but I disagree, the better it is going in the better it will be later. The sharpness setting is electronically varying the sensor distance from the legacy lens helping it achieve sharper focus. This setting is also easily accessed with the Super Guide.
    After putting this together I decide I wanted to have a spare body so I found a used purchased as reconditioned with a K-mount adapter and a 50mm f2.0 SMC-M. After getting it home and playing with I found later after putting my 14-42 kit lens on it that it would not auto-focus nor would it focus manually. I put the lens on my other E-PL1 and it would focus fine. I have tried to find a setting to resolve this but I have been unable to find a setting that can be changed or reset to remedy this and it has the 1.1 firmware. So if some knows of something I overlooked by all means provide me a comment. This is unfortunate because my biggest complaint is with the 4/3 is the crop factor I do not have a good manual 28mm wide angle. I was planning on having to use the 14-42 kit lense as my 28mm wide angle and I only have 1 body that can use it. Plus I would prefer something that produced something more film looking. I was able to locate a Vivitar labeled Samyang 17-28mm legacy zoom. This lens has average reviews but with the sharpness set to 2 it is bitingly sharp but it only crops out to 34-56 and I would prefer a good 28mm equivalent prime. Zenit produces a 16mm fisheye with funky film plane side screw in color filters. If the Russians at Zenit are smart and read this they would make 12, 14, 16, 18, and 19mm 35 manual primes modelled from this existing 16mm 35mm fisheye to fit the new generation crop sensor digital cameras. They are already tooled up to make M42 and K-mounts and they would sell like hotcakes provide they thread it to take filters from the front side and they keep the price around 150 to 200 bucks . They are too many legacy lenses of other focal lengths to make producing those focal, lengths profitable. On the subject of kit lenses they are sharper at there lower 14 and 40mm focal lengths. On all the legacy lenses I use Polarizing filters and I find the Agfa being the better ones of the lower end ones. They use Japanese glass and pass the thump test I learned in my film days. The better filters will produce a crisp distinct tink sound when thumped with your finger. Lesser quality ones produce a dull thud. There are complaints of these and other filters ghosting. On this subject when using legacy lenses use a rubber adjustable lense hood because digital lenses have more coating on them because the silvery shiny sensor will reflect light back into the lense and the legacy are more prone to frontal glare also.
    As for video I did not use it for that nor do I know what to compare it to. But from what I have played with so far it is suitable for any videos I may want to make and yes the button is too easy to activate and I have already acquired a few surprise videos. But I changed the function of this button to change the camera to manual focus mode and I have changed the function to RAW+JPEG or Preview or Face Detection off. On the Face Detection mode issue the autofocus seems to be quicker and surer if it is off when not actually looking for faces. I purchased the audio mike adapter to enhance the resale value one day but haven't used it. When using legacy lenses you can select scene modes and set to Manual focus and then manually focus and adjust the aperature to get the proper exposure but you must have the liveboost off that varies the LCD intensity and actually works better with the EVF. I have found the results produced by the scene modes excellent and I like being able to use legacy lenses with the Scene and Art Modes.
    So my final verdict on the E-PL1? Autofocus issues?, yes the autofocus does not function well in low light. If you want a camera for fast action this is not for you. The JPEGS from this camera are excellent but I shoot RAW + JPEG Large SF on the stills I use this for because I want to become knowledgeable at processing JPEGS and TIFF files. I have read from others posting reviews that this is an excellent digital back for legacy lenses. I think this hits the nail right on the head. This is a camera that can wear many hats. With a 37mm and optical viewfinder it can be a rangefinder type street camera. with the 15mm lens cap lens a convienant P&S and with the EVF and adapters a DLSR using economical excellent legacy lenses. The body has an excellent grip in my opinion. So for me it is an excellent camera for stills which is what I will use it for. For those wanting a camera for action shots look elsewhere. But with the EVF and legacy adapters and lenses it is the size of a DLSR so knowing what I know I know now I probably would opt for a Pentax DLSR with the larger sensor and 1.5 crop factor and in body IS, also maybe a Sony using my K-mounts with adapters as it hs in body IS I believe. But for now I'm committed and am pleased with my photos which is what matters. As my shills grow and progress I will problably keep the pen system and maybe a E-PL5 with a 37mm and optical viewfinder to go with what I already have. But I do see a 24mp K3 Pentax in my future. I want to thank others who have posted on this camera for all the great and useful info they provided.
  • 2013-11-23 08:00
    This is my DLSR, understand and learn its limitations, utilize its potential., Last of the Bohicans
    I am an older 35mm guy. My 1st camera was a 110 instamatic and then I got my hands on an upper end polaroid with bellows and a metal slider to put the film in to develop it. Hard to believe. I got my on-the-fly seat of the pants training on aperature, shutter, f-stops, ISO, ASA focal length, etc when I joined the Navy to see the world. I drug AE-1's. K1000sm and other 35mm SLR's thru deserts, jungles (urban and natural) and across the worlds oceans. I learned certain disciplines early, using a tripod and Fuji 100 with a polarizer I produced many, many postcard quality photos, ASA 400 for handheld work and ASA 800 and 1600 for night snapshots. My favorite setup was Yashica FX3 kit. It was full manual like a k1000 with very good 28mm, 50mm and 135 primes. For me it was the ultimate setup for lugging around on my travels. Later on when the family and life's demands a 35mm point and shoot auto became the snapshot camera for family uses. I remember seeing the 1st digital cameras and the writing on the wall. My 1st digital was a 3.2 MP Canon P&S that took excellent pictures. I purchased it because it had a viewfinder so I could use it in bright sunlight. I became familiar with Chinese manufacturer when the lens mechanism stopped driving the lens and opening the lens. Next was a Samsung NV10 which impressed me due to its metal body. I loved it, It took good photos. It only had an LCD and even with a Delkin Hood it was still difficult to compose a shot in bright sunlight. After 3 years and a couple of thousand snapshots the dreaded CCD blue line slow death started. I started to look for a more serious enthusiast camera that could help me seriously move into the digital era and carry on with the serious passion I had in my 35mm SLR days. Enter the E-PL1.
    I looked a the E-PL1 and decided the two zoom bundle would fit the bill nicely. I read the positive reviews and like the versatility of the two lenses. In figured the LCD was something I could assimilate to. Let me state now that many will disagree with my assessment of this camera but I stand by my findings and hope to help others of my age and experience make an educated assessment on the purchase this camera and determination of whether it will meet their needs. 1st off plan the price of the VF2 viewfinder with the eyecup if you are serious about composition. The LCD is just too difficult to see in bright sunlight. Plus being an old SLR guy holding the camera closer and firmly is a better discipline. Better yet purchase the VF4, it just a few bucks more. It will not be an upgrade on the E-PL1 but will be if you decide to upgrade to a 16MP pen such as the E-PL5. After I first purchased this camera and the VF2 viewfinder my niece was having her wedding and asked if I would do the photography. Using just the 14-42mm kit lens I arrived to find that her grandmother had already hired a photographer with Nikon DSLR's. I Shot photos anyhow and in the end many of the photos were better than the hired photographer took. This was handheld and in auto mode. About 50% of the photos were outstanding. The problems with the rest were due to serious backlighting issues causing underexposure of the subject areas. Also there were low light focusing issues where the camera could not focus or was out of focus. Had I understood the manual controls of the camera and been able to be where the photographer had been and using my Tripod the rest of the photos would have been stellar also. It was also a record 108 degrees and the camera functioned fabulously. It did go thru a couple a batteries so invest in extra aftermarket batteries with a wall charger. I can say with out a doubt you can use this camera at the professional level to shoot weddings if you understand and know how to utilize its potential. After becoming ill for a year and putting my resurgent photography hobby on hold I once again picked up the pen to learn its finer points. As a Brit once told me "You Yanks are ok but you never bother to read the bloody instructions". As such I highly recommend the E-PL1 for dummies book, it is well worth the money spent on it. Once you read this book and understand the E-PL1's potential it becomes pretty straight forward. From looking at a friends E-PM1 and E-PL3 it will help you navigate and understand other PEN menus also. I can comment or compare the E-PL1 menus compared to the brands because this is my 1st digital camera I have attempted to use manually. The key to using this camera manually is the Super Guide. I find using this operating the camera manually is very straight forward. At the time I purchased this camera I had no idea that you could purchase adapters to utilize legacy lenses. My biggest complaint with digital camera systems is the staggering cost of good prime lenses which is why I purchased with the 2 zoom bundle. I was overcome with joy as I had a large collection of K-mount bodies and lenses. I have selected a new Sigma 28-85mm I had in new condition in the box. a 28mm f 1.8 SMC-A Pentax, 50mm 1F1.2 SMC-M Pentax, and an excellent , super sharp new in the box Vivitar 135mm Series 1. These I already had. I purchased a used in new condition excellent Rokinon 70-200mm zoom for 20 bucks. The results with these legacy lenses have been excellent. Being an older person to me digital photos have what I call a digital look. This may be hard for some to understand but people my age reading this they will understand. It is like listening to stereo music in the old days with the old Marantz, Sansui, Fisher ball bearing analog stereo receivers, the digitally processed stereos sounded digital. To my old eyes the photos look digital and the legacy lenses make it look more film-like. While on the subject of using these legacy lenses remember that if you us IS make sure you set the focal length for the lens and figure in the crop factor, if not you will be working against yourself. If you are using a legacy zoom this will need to be changed as you vary the focal length. If you plan on changing focal lengths a lot you might fare better if you shut the IS off. Also remember that with any lens you use shut the IS off when using a tripod. I am of the opinion that if you are using the IS with legacy lenses and the focal length is incorrect the IS circuitry will be stressed because it will be constantly hunting for a solution it cannot achieve due to be fed incorrect data. The 4/3 lenses the focal length is fed to the body automatically thru the electrical contacts. Also make sure you figure in the crop factor. Of course these changes can be done reasonably fast using the super guide. Other anomalies to deal with when using legacy lenses with using adapters is that the legacy lenses put a lot of weight on the camera body when using a tripod. I was able to get an adapter on Amazon that has the tripod mount on the adapter so you can put the weight on the adapter and not the camera body. This is also beneficial in that you have to remove the camera off the tripod mount to change the battery or memory as they are accessed from the bottom of the camera. By mounting on the adapter you avoid this. The tripod mount capable legacy adapter is highly recommended. Also when using legacy adapters set the sharpness control to +1 on primes and +2 on zooms as a general rule for best focusing results. Experiment with each legacy lense to finds its sweet spot. Others have told me that you can process this out later but I disagree, the better it is going in the better it will be later. The sharpness setting is electronically varying the sensor distance from the legacy lens helping it achieve sharper focus. This setting is also easily accessed with the Super Guide.
    After putting this together I decide I wanted to have a spare body so I found a used purchased as reconditioned with a K-mount adapter and a 50mm f2.0 SMC-M. After getting it home and playing with I found later after putting my 14-42 kit lens on it that it would not auto-focus nor would it focus manually. I put the lens on my other E-PL1 and it would focus fine. I have tried to find a setting to resolve this but I have been unable to find a setting that can be changed or reset to remedy this and it has the 1.1 firmware. So if some knows of something I overlooked by all means provide me a comment. This is unfortunate because my biggest complaint is with the 4/3 is the crop factor I do not have a good manual 28mm wide angle. I was planning on having to use the 14-42 kit lense as my 28mm wide angle and I only have 1 body that can use it. Plus I would prefer something that produced something more film looking. I was able to locate a Vivitar labeled Samyang 17-28mm legacy zoom. This lens has average reviews but with the sharpness set to 2 it is bitingly sharp but it only crops out to 34-56 and I would prefer a good 28mm equivalent prime. Zenit produces a 16mm fisheye with funky film plane side screw in color filters. If the Russians at Zenit are smart and read this they would make 12, 14, 16, 18, and 19mm 35 manual primes modelled from this existing 16mm 35mm fisheye to fit the new generation crop sensor digital cameras. They are already tooled up to make M42 and K-mounts and they would sell like hotcakes provide they thread it to take filters from the front side and they keep the price around 150 to 200 bucks . They are too many legacy lenses of other focal lengths to make producing those focal, lengths profitable. On the subject of kit lenses they are sharper at there lower 14 and 40mm focal lengths. On all the legacy lenses I use Polarizing filters and I find the Agfa being the better ones of the lower end ones. They use Japanese glass and pass the thump test I learned in my film days. The better filters will produce a crisp distinct tink sound when thumped with your finger. Lesser quality ones produce a dull thud. There are complaints of these and other filters ghosting. On this subject when using legacy lenses use a rubber adjustable lense hood because digital lenses have more coating on them because the silvery shiny sensor will reflect light back into the lense and the legacy are more prone to frontal glare also.
    As for video I did not use it for that nor do I know what to compare it to. But from what I have played with so far it is suitable for any videos I may want to make and yes the button is too easy to activate and I have already acquired a few surprise videos. But I changed the function of this button to change the camera to manual focus mode and I have changed the function to RAW+JPEG or Preview or Face Detection off. On the Face Detection mode issue the autofocus seems to be quicker and surer if it is off when not actually looking for faces. I purchased the audio mike adapter to enhance the resale value one day but haven't used it. When using legacy lenses you can select scene modes and set to Manual focus and then manually focus and adjust the aperature to get the proper exposure but you must have the liveboost off that varies the LCD intensity and actually works better with the EVF. I have found the results produced by the scene modes excellent and I like being able to use legacy lenses with the Scene and Art Modes.
    So my final verdict on the E-PL1? Autofocus issues?, yes the autofocus does not function well in low light. If you want a camera for fast action this is not for you. The JPEGS from this camera are excellent but I shoot RAW + JPEG Large SF on the stills I use this for because I want to become knowledgeable at processing JPEGS and TIFF files. I have read from others posting reviews that this is an excellent digital back for legacy lenses. I think this hits the nail right on the head. This is a camera that can wear many hats. With a 37mm and optical viewfinder it can be a rangefinder type street camera. with the 15mm lens cap lens a convienant P&S and with the EVF and adapters a DLSR using economical excellent legacy lenses. The body has an excellent grip in my opinion. So for me it is an excellent camera for stills which is what I will use it for. For those wanting a camera for action shots look elsewhere. But with the EVF and legacy adapters and lenses it is the size of a DLSR so knowing what I know I know now I probably would opt for a Pentax DLSR with the larger sensor and 1.5 crop factor and in body IS, also maybe a Sony using my K-mounts with adapters as it hs in body IS I believe. But for now I'm committed and am pleased with my photos which is what matters. As my shills grow and progress I will problably keep the pen system and maybe a E-PL5 with a 37mm and optical viewfinder to go with what I already have. But I do see a 24mp K3 Pentax in my future. I want to thank others who have posted on this camera for all the great and useful info they provided.
  • 2013-07-21 07:00
    It's okay, Chenli Ke
    It looks dirty. It was a gift so I cleaned it by myself. But the quality was good and everything was in the bag.
  • 2013-07-12 07:00
    Great value for amazing camera, Diego De la Cruz Bornholdt
    I like taking photographs a lot, but haven't really spend on a good camera, like SLR. When this format of Micro 4/3 appear, i was really interested and it has been a great discovery so far.
    The camera let's you take so much better photographs than a point and shoot, and the size, weight and layout of the buttons gives you every control you need.
    The best part it's the capacity to and accesories, the kit lens its not very versatile, so i'm looking to buy another with more zoom. But takes great quality pictures. Also you can add a more powerful Flash or a ViewFinder that looks awesome.
  • 2013-07-02 07:00
    I loved it, Talina
    I love this camera, the design is awesome, the quality is great! it's small. I love tha the lens is manual. Definitely one of my favourites, it arrived on time and in good shape.
  • 2013-06-17 07:00
    nice, Pacificard "alexpuchito"
    i bought this form my friend the price was good and he feels happy with his camera for mi is ok
  • 2013-05-22 07:00
    One Tiny Beef, Nick D. "zero2hide"
    Love this camera, and got a great deal on Amazon since a newer model was introduced.
    The only issue I have is the outdated charger with its unnecessary cord. A charger with flip pins would have been a perfect match for this compact camera. I am getting increasingly annoyed at this oversight the more I travel with multitudes of cords and chargers!
  • 2013-05-20 07:00
    I love this item, SEUNGWHAN BAIK
    as a handy camera ,it is good one. Just light weight and small and easy handling...also pictures are very good quality.But
    only the multi-shooting speed is not so fast as expected
  • 2013-05-09 07:00
    GREAT CAMERA, DAISY C. WATCO
    I GAVE THIS CAMERA TO MY NIECE AS A GIFT. GOOD ONE AND RIGHT PRICING. IT HAS NICE
    COLOT TOO.
  • 2013-04-23 07:00
    Vacation saved, SM Anderson
    i have been extremely pleased with camera. This is the third Olympus brand that I now own, and the first Olympus digital, I very pleased with the image quality, and the quick service in delivery while on vacation after mechanical and operation ending issues with the digitalI had with me on the trip. Definitely recommend!!!!
  • 2013-04-17 07:00
    I'll tell you why I love it..., Susy V
    this camera is very useful with it's compact size and affordability. The images are great; crisp and clean and the look is it is fantastic. I have gotten so many compliments already and I've only had it for a week or something like that... I recommend it. It's beautiful and it is good.
  • 2013-04-17 07:00
    Excellent mirrorless camera, M. L. Gregory "jhawk1000"
    This Olympus is great. I bought it, a couple of batteries and a flash card. Since then, I have added a 40-150mm lens. It takes wonderful pictures. The only con is that the LCD monitor is hard to see in bright light but that is for all cameras without the viewfinder. Probably will eventually buy the VF-2 viewfinder.
  • 2013-04-14 07:00
    Great camera, Melanie Thompson "pigsnfish"
    I'm a point and shoot kind of girl, but my teen girls like what this camera can do. The 16-year-old took a few kids' senior pictures with it. They turned out wonderfully. I, however, still struggle. There are times when I have it in automatic mode and I take videos instead of pictures. No one in my family can figure out how/why I can do that, but it happens about 1/2 the time I take pictures. Definitely worth the money!